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Referral Relationships Matter In A Wage, Hour, and Overtime Practice

The FairLaw Firm Understands the Value of Relationships

I built the FairLaw Firm with the help of professional relationships – both old and new. I reached out to old friends, existing clients, former clients, and to other attorneys and law firms with respected practices in other areas of the law to build and grow my practice. I did this both in Miami and elsewhere. I am very proud of the relationships that I built and maintained, and I am continually seeking to use these mutually beneficial relationships to continue to grow my unpaid overtime wage and minimum wage practice.

I am fortunate to have gained the trust and respect of other attorneys who ask my firm to help their clients when they see a potential wage theft claim. This is not by default, but the result of hard work both on my part and on theirs. I rely on other attorneys to diligently analyze their clients’ wages (pay stubs and earnings statements) and to talk openly with their clients about their working hours and conditions. I also am constantly working with other attorneys and law firms to help them identify the types of minimum wage and overtime wage violations that could lead to a successful wage theft claim. In the end, this is a two-way street; I try to educate other attorneys about how they can further help their clients, I often get suggestions about how I can improve my practice, and we both work together to benefit mutual clients.

One of the things that I have heard time and time again is from lawyers who complain that either they referred an unpaid overtime wage or minimum wage case and had no idea what happened with that referral, or that the client referred was dissatisfied with the manner in which a case was handled. The FairLaw Firm seeks to avoid these problems through transparency and participation.

And while I say “referral”, I actively encourage “participation”. The FairLaw Firm oftentimes represents clients in wage claims who are currently represented in a workers’ compensation claim (and possibly a retaliatory discharge claim). For this reason, I believe that it is integral for referring counsel to review the proposed settlement documents – which provides transparency and an additional layer of protection to the client.

For more information, check out the FairLaw Firm’s policy on referrals and relationships, which I recently posted on the FairLaw Firm’s website.

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